Breaking Down the CBA 2015/16 Season: Part Three

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Part three of the CBA preview is a go! Today, we’ll evaluate the Jiangsu Tongxi Monkey Kings, Liaoning Leopards, Shanxi Dragons, Shandong Bulls and Shanghai Sharks and see whether improvement is in their path or if there will be some disappointment once the season is over. Part One and Part Two can still be read here. Continue reading “Breaking Down the CBA 2015/16 Season: Part Three”

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The CBA Draft And What It Could Mean For Chinese Basketball (EDIT)

China_basketball_association On the surface, the CBA offseason is six months of dead time. The national team gathers together the county’s best players together for several days (and sometimes even several weeks) of training sessions at various locations inside and outside China. For two months, the National Basketball League (NBL), the sport’s second tier in China, also gets played, albeit to little or no fanfare. Given that this is one of the few periods of free time for CBA players, right now is also the best time of year to be getting married so very tall dudes are either walking down the aisle right this second or watching one of their teammates do the same thing. But it doesn’t mean that there isn’t any meaningful basketball related activity going on. There’s plenty of it– but at this time of year, it’s all being held behind closed doors and far away from the court (and prying eyes). Continue reading “The CBA Draft And What It Could Mean For Chinese Basketball (EDIT)”

The CBA Week In Brief: Bayi, Stephon Marbury And The Undoubtable Talent Of Schoolboy Zhou

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Another round of games, another week of story lines. This time around its the struggles of a CBA legend, one of China’s oldest teams in turmoil, another mishandling a young star and China’s next great big man is emerging on the horizon in Xinjiang.

Continue reading “The CBA Week In Brief: Bayi, Stephon Marbury And The Undoubtable Talent Of Schoolboy Zhou”

Chris Tang And The Silent Winds Of Change In Chinese Basketball

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In his first game for UC Riverside (go Highlanders, etc) last week, Chris Tang, a Chinese point guard born in Nantong, would play five minutes, pick up a foul and an assists and that was pretty much it. For a player that was once being dubbed the mainland’s Jeremy Lin, this was not a great look. For Chinese basketball as a whole however, given a little of time, this might just work out.

Indeed, the very fact that another Chinese-born is now playing in high(ish) level college basketball in America can only be a good thing. The CBA- for all the chest puffing it has been exhibiting in recent weeks due to the ‘CBA20’ celebrations to commemorate the league’s twentieth anniversary- is still in desperate need of fresh ideas. Wang Zhelin is obviously seen as the next great Chinese NBA player but given the size of the country’s basketball playing population, the harsh reality is that the Fujian big man should not be China’s only viable candidate for the big time.

Continue reading “Chris Tang And The Silent Winds Of Change In Chinese Basketball”

Shark Fin Hoops CBA Preseason Power Rankings: 11 – 20

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With the Chinese Basketball Association starting on November 1st, basketball in the country is starting to slowly come back to life. By now teams have filled their rosters with free agents from both inside and outside of China and its now probably the best time to assess the quality of each of the twenty teams in the newly expanded league. This of course being China, fortunes can change very quickly for some organizations depending on the overseas players they brought in (or didn’t) and which local players managed to improve over the summer break. In the first of two segments, its time to look at the bottom half of the league based on the information that’s been available for much of the last couple of months. Continue reading “Shark Fin Hoops CBA Preseason Power Rankings: 11 – 20”

Yao Ming’s Private War With The ‘Third Foreigner’

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Since his return to China after retiring from the NBA, there arguably hasn’t been a more fascinating figure in Chinese basketball than Yao Ming (seen here towering over  7″3 center, Zhang Zhaoxu). As owner of the Shanghai Sharks, the team he bought in 2009, he has been given an opportunity to air his opinions on the state of the CBA. This, along with his massive popularity in China and abroad, has given him a unique platform to assert influence on Chinese basketball; something he has done in a very measured but noticeable way.

Indeed, the big man has shown himself to be a dab hand at maneuvering within the various state institutions that have reached out to him since his return to the mainland. Besides the CBA, Yao has been a part of Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), an essentially ceremonial body that is supposed to aid the Chinese Communist Party in drafting policy and laws. Yao though knows the game he is playing; the CPPCC need a famous face like his to give it legitimacy in the eyes of the Chinese public and in exchange Yao has used it to promote his own special interests such as animal preservation and ivory poaching in Africa. His CPPCC involvement, plus his hands-on running of the Sharks (he attends every home game and has been known to supervise training), completing his final year of university studies and an ownership of a winery at a time when the Chinese middle class spends millions of dollars each year on expensive alcohol has led to the internet joke; ‘does Yao ever sleep?Continue reading “Yao Ming’s Private War With The ‘Third Foreigner’”